Comfort food from around the world.

Taking home recipes that our youth have grown up with and help transform them into dishes that are inspiring, as well as delicious.

For centuries, families and communities have gathered around the dinner table to “break bread”, and recipes are passed down from generation to generation. Our youth come from many different cultures and tradition of food. We take the home recipes that our youth have grown up with and help transform them into dishes that are inspiring, as well as delicious. We believe that food nourishes the body and the soul.

 
OldSkoolCafe-tongan-island-specialty.jpg

Taumoepeau Ota

Ota ‘ika is a Polynesian dish similar to a Latin ceviche. Our Ota, named for one of our former youth’s mother, was taught in the Tongan tradition and includes swai fish marinated in lemon juice. One of her greatest joys was the chance to gather Old Skool youth along with her daughter, to learn how to make this family dish.  We honor her with naming it Taumoepeau, meaning ”conqueror of waves“.

Jordan-fried-chicken.jpg

Jordan’s Fried Chicken

Jordan, a former youth chef, remembers his grandmother’s fried chicken. The special blend of seasonings were a reminder of his childhood and he wanted to bring those tastes to Old Skool. With help from our chef mentor, Jordan perfected his secret spices and this dish has become one of our most popular menu items. Who doesn’t love fried chicken?

Abu’s West African Peanut Butter Stew

Abu’s West African Peanut Butter Stew

This unique dish came to us via a grandmother’s recipe from Sierra Leone. Immigrating as a small child, Abu’s family started a new life in America but brought the flavors of his country to Old Skool. With hints of peanut butter, this hearty stew gives you a hint of the flavors and textures of West African home cooking at our home, Old Skool Cafe.

dingbat-main-5.png